Peter Zeihan

Geopolitical Expert, Strategist, Futurist and Bestselling Author

why book peter?

  • Peter Zeihan is a renowned geopolitical strategist, blending expertise in demography, economics, energy, politics, and security to forecast global trends
  • From the U.S. State Department to Stratfor, Peter’s career spans government service and private sector intelligence, culminating in founding Zeihan on Geopolitics
  • Peter’s irreverent approach makes complex geopolitical topics accessible and relevant, captivating audiences with insights into tomorrow’s headlines

Biography

Peter Zeihan is a geopolitical strategist, which is a fancy way of saying he helps people understand how the world works. He brings an expert understanding of demography, economics, energy, politics, technology, and security to help clients best prepare for an uncertain future.

Throughout his career, Peter has worked for the U.S. State Department in Australia, the DC think tank community, and has helped develop the analytical models for Stratfor, one of the world’s premier private intelligence companies. Peter founded his own firm — Zeihan on Geopolitics — in 2012 to provide a select group of clients with direct, custom analytical products. Today, those clients represent a vast array of sectors including energy majors, financial institutions, business associations, agricultural interests, universities, and the U.S. military.

With a keen eye toward what will drive tomorrow’s headlines, his irreverent approach transforms topics that are normally dense and heavy into accessible, relevant takeaways for audiences of all types.

Peter Zeihan is also a New York Times bestselling author whose first three books — The Accidental Superpower, The Absent Superpower and Disunited Nations — have been recommended by Mitt Romney, Fareed Zakaria and Ian Bremmer. Peter’s fourth book, The End of the World is Just the Beginning: Mapping the Collapse of Globalization, was published in June 2022 and was also a New York Times bestseller.

With a keen eye toward what will drive tomorrow’s headlines, his irreverent approach transforms topics that are normally dense and heavy into accessible, relevant takeaways for audiences of all types.

Topics

A Peek Past the End of the World

It has been a long time coming, but we have arrived at the end of the world. Decades of demographic degradation are now manifesting as chronic shortages of labor and capital. Globalisation isn’t simply past its peak, it is disintegrating with accelerating speed. A fleet of ends beckon: global energy, global agriculture, global manufacturing, integrated Europe. China. But an end to this world does not mean an end to the world, simply that the rules of the game and the lists of winners and losers are changing. As the environment rearranges it’ll be a (very) bumpy ride, but we stand at the launch of the greatest period of growth in North American history.

Getting Through the End of World

For the past decade, Peter has been discussing the nature, strength and weaknesses of the international system. How post-World War II institutions, geography and demographics have made our world our world…and how it was never going to last. Well, we are now at that world’s end. Any number of factors – the Ukraine War, the fall of China and Germany, energy breakdowns, supply chain collapses, workforce shrivelings, financial contractions, and so on – would independently be sufficient to break the international economy. And they are all happening at once. We were always going to get here, and here we are. So let’s discuss what happens next.

Getting Through the End of World

For the past decade, Peter has been discussing the nature, strength and weaknesses of the international system. How post-World War II institutions, geography and demographics have made our world our world…and how it was never going to last. Well, we are now at that world’s end. Any number of factors – the Ukraine War, the fall of China and Germany, energy breakdowns, supply chain collapses, workforce shrivelings, financial contractions, and so on – would independently be sufficient to break the international economy. And they are all happening at once. We were always going to get here, and here we are. So let’s discuss what happens next.

After the Peak: Finance in the Age of Less

For the past three decades our world has known ever-rising volumes of money. Whether from Wall Street, the Federal Reserve, Europe or East Asia, this rising tide of capital at ever-cheaper rates has defined the post-Cold War era. It’s ending. Now. For reasons geopolitical and demographic, the globalisation of finance is in its final months just as the overall inflows are dissolving for reasons demographic. This isn’t momentary. We will not return the capital structure of the 2000s and 2010s within our lifetimes. The questions now become how deep the crash will be, which sectors will suffer the most, and what islands will be able to weather the coming financial storm?

At the Edge of Disorder

The concept of countries being able to buy and sell their wares openly on the international marketplace is inviolable. The freedom to sail one’s products around the world is a given. Everything from the transfer of money to the accessibility of energy is sacrosanct. Yet all this and more is artificial: an unintended — if happy — side effect of the American-led global Order. With that Order in its final days, all countries and all industries must learn to operate in a world as unstructured as it is dangerous. Join us as Peter Zeihan lays out how we got to where we are, and what the future holds for sectors as diverse as energy, agriculture, finance, manufacturing and transport.

No Assembly Required: the Future of Global Manufacturing

The world of manufacturing is an endlessly specialised venture, with most manufacturers sourcing components from scores of facilities across a dozen or more countries. But what if the ability to sail components from site to site became compromised? What if capital availability proves insufficient to update industrial bases as technology evolves? What if intermediate and end markets become less desirable – or less accessible? All that and more is about to happen, which signals the end of manufacturing as we know it. The successful manufacturers of the future will be those who can command access to raw materials, capital, labor and markets – all in the same location.

Peter Zeihan

Resources

Podcasts

Books

Peter Zeihan Book Cover the end of the world is just the beginning
Peter Zeihan Book Cover The Absent Super Power
Peter Zeihan Book Cover Dis United Nations
Peter Zeihan Book Cover The Accidental Super Power

testimonials

“Peter spoke at AltaCorp Capital’s institutional investor conference, where he used his prior insights into some of the key forces driving change in today’s geo-political environment such as us energy self sufficiency, demographics and geography to explain the current state of multi-lateral and bi-lateral trade. There was a purposeful provocation at work that drove a thoughtful discussion. We received significant positive feedback and requests for his books. Peter’s insights have significantly influenced my worldview, investments, and business perspective.”

Jon Horsman, CEO, AltaCorps

“Peter’s knowledge on geopolitics combined with his ease and entertaining delivery make his presentations exceptional. He consistently gets the top rated score amongst our speakers, bringing great food for thought. He is worth every penny.”

CoBank

“We highly recommend Peter, he was an informative and engaging presenter to top executives at our recent board meeting. Attendees’ primary follow-up requests was to have Peter speak again and to give him more time to share his exceptional insights.”

Georgia Chamber of Commerce

“Peter has spoken at a few of our most exclusive and signature events for top clients, receiving extremely high reviews across the board. His brilliance around geopolitics is well-matched with a very dynamic and high-energy speaking style. He kept our audiences thoroughly engaged and the time allotted never seemed to be enough to get to all the lively questions and dialogue his insights sparked.”

J.P. Morgan Asset Management

“Peter Zeihan is the BEST speaker we have had in years (and we’ve had a lot of great speakers). He blended strong content with engaging and entertaining delivery. Peter received a standing ovation, our attendees are simply buzzing about his session. I have been congratulated several times for the “great pick” (this never happens). The icing on the cake was his warm, friendly demeanour in the down time. He was a delight.”

Industrial Asset Management Council

“As our opening keynote speaker, Peter hit a home run with our executive conference attendees. [Peter was] insightful and thought provoking, plus did a great job in addressing the key geopolitical issues faced by the energy sector”

American Gas Association

“We hold an annual conference for the member companies of Lubar & Co. We solicit feedback each year from our executives as to what they would like hear at the next gathering. The unanimous consensus was to hear from someone who had interesting perspectives on the future. I read many books and found the history and outlook contained in The Accidental Superpower to be exactly what our management teams were looking for. Peter was an engaging speaker and captivated the audience for ninety minutes. He received top ratings from our audience!”

Lubar & Co

“As always, Peter did a great job engaging our audiences with information on how geopolitics will affect their businesses, and how they can use geopolitical trends to inform their decisions. Peter makes it entertaining and fast paced, always receiving top marks!”

North West Farm Credit Services

“Peter was a thoroughly engaging speaker for my YPO Chapter (Young President’s Organization). He gave a global overview of geopolitics, geography, natural resources, debt, and demography to illustrate the future rise/fall of countries and where regional conflict is likely to spark. Peter then brought us a fresh perspective on American leadership at home/abroad and the effect international debt and our trade agreements will have on American business sectors. He was funny, engaging, and insightful. Peter’s presentation was one of the best we’ve ever had.”

Young Presidents Organization